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Ragnar Trail Relay – Lake Tahoe

Ragnar Trail Relay – Lake Tahoe 2016

So this was one of the three main races I was hoping to complete this year. (The other two were Escape From Alcatraz Tri, and Half Iron Michigan that I opted out of in favor of a full Iron in December)
Ragnar was first introduced to me through a buddy of mine in Florida. He had brought up the possibility of doing a relay with our group out there in the Keys. But that was the road relay. Ragnar has two styles of races. Point-to-point road running, and multiple-loop trail running and camping. As I looked at the two different options I found their Tahoe race that immediately appealed to me _because_ it was in Tahoe and I knew it would be hard.

 

I’ve lived and trained in Tahoe two different summers for Ironman Tahoe. So I knew exactly what this race would require from me.

But I didn’t know enough people to assemble a team on my own. And frankly, at the time of this writing in July, I have competed in 11 races that I can think off the top of my head. Ragnar didn’t look like it was in the cards for me.

And then I randomly found a team last minute..

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Escape From Alcatraz 2016

Everyone calls this race a “bucket list” race. Personally I think that term is ridiculously cliche and can’t stand it. I would prefer just to say “Yeah, it’s definitely one you should try and do if you’re interested”. And there’s currently a solid argument to be made that the 40% increase in cost this year is due to every triathlon writer calling this race “bucket list”.

I had first heard about Escape from friends. And then looked it up online back in 2014 for the 2015 race. I entered the second drawing, but was not selected. However I did get selected to race in the 2016 race in the next drawing that was held.

Reading about the race online was interesting because you see everyone’s underlying panic when they ask questions in forums or discuss it online. I didn’t consider the race distances to be difficult lengths. It was a 1.5 mile ocean swim in the Bay, 18 mile ride through San Francisco, and 8 mile run – including a beach section.
But my background with triathlons includes Ironman Lake Tahoe – so I now compare nearly every race to that one. People were particularly scared about the water, but when I lived in SoCal before recently moving back to the SF Bay Area I would train in the ocean. So waves don’t really bother me, nor does the salt.

And when it came down to the actual race, I knew I would have a fun time racing with minimal struggle throughout the day if I wanted. My goal would be 3hr 30min. And when race day came around I managed a 3:35:06

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CAMERA TESTING WITH THE SONY A77 (4 OF 4)

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Part four of my four part write-up on testing the Sony a77 DSLR in various sports setting that I typically shoot  with my job. Please check out the previous post for details on the first test and a bit of an intro to this multi-part project: here

Surfing photography and the US Open.

My last test of the gear was at the US Open of Surfing in Huntington Beach. This would also be a bigger test of the longest lens I had with me to use, the 70-400 zoom. Combined with the 1.5 sensor I would have an effective 600mm of reach at the longest end.
Overall the lens and camera seemed to perform pretty well. I still wasn’t exactly in the best position to shoot the competition, but that’s my fault and the beach was ridiculously crowded for the main event.
Focus and tracking seemed to work pretty well. I was using a monopod for stabilization. And while I’m sure using a 600mm monster lens from another company would have resulted in pictures that were a bit better, I certainly can’t complain about the quality of the shots from this lens and camera combo.
I’m leaving out a lot of small details that are similar to what I wrote last week in Part 3, from the Lucas Oil Off Road Race. You can click back to that one if you’re curious.

So, what were my overall thoughts on using the a77 as a sports camera:

Focusing – I think there are several things I would change if this were to be a dedicated sports camera (which it’s not designed to be, please keep that in mind). I personally didn’t like the cross shape of the focus points. I’m accustomed to a diamond shape that allows for some point selection in the corners. But this is just related to how I like to shoot. Biggest annoyance was the seemingly slow adjustment of point selection. Also, the selected point “glows” grey. I want it to glow red. It was very difficult to see the grey selected point when looking through the viewfinder or at the LCD, especially on a bright day.

Continuous focus seemed to work really well as long as your subject was in the center of the frame. And when shooting slower moving sports the tracking focus worked well enough to be used, too. For motorsports though the subjects moved too fast or were too erratic. Again, the tracking/registered point option is likely best for people in groups (like the bride at a wedding) or with slower moving sports subjects that are high contrast against the background.

The lenses – I thoroughly enjoyed the lenses themselves. They were sharp, quiet enough to where I didn’t notice much of a difference compared to my gear and seemed to focus fast. While they turn and lock clockwise like Canon glass, they zoom opposite, like Nikon glass. This only threw me off a few times after years of muscle memory. haha!
Price-wise they’re not far off from the other major brands like Canon/Nikon for their respective focal lengths, as well.
The rear lens caps need to be redesigned somehow. There is only one way to screw them on when swapping lenses. So I feel time was wasted at several points when I was trying to do a quick change and fumbled while trying to line up the cap on the lens just-so. Picture it this way… if the face of the lens cap is a clock and there is notch at 3’oclock, you HAVE to line up the cap/lens exactly at 3’oclock or you can’t put the cap back on. Compared to a Canon cap which would lock at, say, 3 AND 9… you are more likely to re-cap quickly. Does that make sense?

The Digital Viewfinder – this was a big adjustment for me, Sony was right. I liked the internal leveler, and things like the option to show you in-the-viewfinder what the exposure will look like. But on overcast days like two of the race days I shot, when it was “bright out without being bright out” the digital viewfinder was hard to see and seemed dim looking at it compared to outside. Think of when you’ve taken a photo with your phone on a cloudy day… you know how it looks muted/dim on the screen but through your eyes it’s bright out? It’s exactly like that. (Yes, I know what 14% grey is, I’m not going super technical in explaining it here though). Do note that the viewfinder was also at the brightest setting, too.
The flip out LCD was handy – which I didn’t think I would like. But it was a nice feature to have when standing there, camera on monopod, reviewing shots.

Body Design – The design of the body was what I had the hardest time with. This has everything to do with muscle memory and personal preference. So take what I’m about to say with a very big grain of salt.
I had a hard time getting used to using the camera body. I’m not a fan of the “power button by the shutter” design. Nikon does this too… I’ve always thought it seemed silly. I always leave my cameras powered on and in sleep mode. This way they can be started quick and I never have try to shoot and think “oh, I didn’t turn it on”. But with the LCD’s of the Sony I felt the need to turn off the camera more often than I normally do. Startup seemed a tad slow for my taste, especially when I was turning off/on to conserve battery.
I didn’t like the sensor placement for auto-switching the LCD to the viewfinder, but I don’t know if that’s really a design change that is even possible.
I’ve already mentioned to Sony that there should also be an option for “no quick preview on screen” after capturing the photo. Also, I think there needs to be an option to set “preview for 2 seconds on LCD ‘ONLY’”. This way you get your quick preview looking at the back of the screen and then can go back to shooting. Currently if you use the “Preview for xx Seconds” feature it will show up in the viewfinder, too, blocking what you’re trying to shoot until it times out or until you tap the shutter button to return to shooting mode.
I’m not a fan of front adjustment wheels. This is also person preference. I find them too easy to hit/roll between shots and mess up your settings. But I understand this is something other shooters would say “well just don’t do that!”
Another design issue I had an unexpected problem with was the Video button. There is a large Video button on the back that if you hit at any time it will start recording. Great for videographers, bad for photographers. I knocked this many times and unknowingly started recording and didn’t realize it til I lifted the camera to my eye to shoot. I also did this a lot when I went to flip out the screen since the button is right above the corner of the screen most right-handed people would pull on to release the screen. Note: This CAN be turned off in the menu, I simply didn’t look long enough trying to figure out how to disable the button, however Sony clarified that it is an option.

Battery life – overall it seemed pretty great. I was just doing long days and only had one battery. However it also charged very quick.
Size of weight of the camera is nice and light, certainly a comfortable camera for all around shooting day to day.

So what was my overall impression of the camera? I enjoyed my time with it, but it’s not perfect for heavy sports shooters.
This is pretty much what I went in expecting, and from my understanding this is also what Sony was looking to learn more about by loaning me the gear to try out. There is no way that a sub-$2,000 camera will do what a $7,000 sports body will… This includes Canon and Nikon cameras in the $1-2,000 range.
Who would I recommend this for? Wedding Photographers, Portrait guys, Hobbyists, Weekend Warriors, and Amateurs alike. If you shoot “a lot of everything” and occasionally might do some sports work, it’d be a great system. There are some awesome lens options (let’s be honest, plenty of Nikon and Canon shooters pay top dollar for Zeiss glass for their cameras, too). The camera is light, feature rich with things you didn’t even know you’d need (like facial programming for your kids school performance, or that wedding you’re shooting).
I don’t think that it’s ready for the big sporting events – not for action photography just yet. But what’s cool to see is that Sony is working on it and doing the research they can to create a better system for everyone.

Click the break for photos from the US Open of Surfing

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CAMERA TESTING WITH THE SONY A77 (3 OF 4)

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Part three of my four part write-up on testing the Sony a77 DSLR in various sports setting that I typically shoot  with my job. Please check out the previous post for details on the first test and a bit of an intro to this multi-part project: here

Taking the Sony a77 to the track

This is where I was most curious about the a77 and lenses… the racetrack.

The first chance I had at the track with the Sony system was with the Formula Drift race series. I was in Seattle for one of my larger clients, Falken Tire, who I handle a portion of their motorsports photography for. The first day I arrived earlier than I normally would for a race, which gave me a couple practice sessions to get out and test shoot a bit with the a77. I would be using the 300/2.8 that I brought out with me.

While I was, again, happy with how the lenses performed I was a little bummed with the speed of the focus tracking. I was getting a bit of motion blur even when using faster shutter speeds. But again, this could also have been human error, I won’t deny that either. The 300 & a77 combo gives and effective 450mm/2.8 reach – this is VERY far for Drift and Seattle was a smaller track (proximity of photogs to cars) compared to Atlanta or Jersey.
But more frustrating for me as a sport shooter were the delays of the camera itself. When bursting at 10fps (or just shooting anything in general) the Sony system puts a brief preview of the image you just shot up on the screen or viewfinder – whichever one you’re using at the time. There is no way to turn this off. In the menu you can turn off previews (or set them for 2, 4, etc, seconds). But even after turning my previews to Off, there is still a brief moment the image is on your display. I think this is the camera’s way of telling you “Hey man, I took a shot!” compared with a Canon or Nikon you’ll have that brief moment of black while the mirror and shutter are up to exposure the sensor. So, I am guessing Sony put this there as a way to reassure you the photo was captured.
Note: This is something that I’ve already talked to Sony about to try and clarify, with them, what I mean by the screen pausing. Now I wouldn’t compare the pause to the brief flash of black from a shutter on a Canon or Nikon – that’s too quick to affect your shot. The image pause on the Sony I found distracting enough to screw up my framing. This is something Sony also said they’ll ask about since it’s not a complaint they’ve heard previously.

But I want it turned off – or the ability to turn it off. That fraction of a second that there is an image in your viewfinder of something that JUST happened is long enough for your subject to move a bit and your framing to get messed up. So while it doesn’t affect the AF or anything like that, you might still not-get the shot due to accidentally cropping part of the subject out.
Now, I know that nothing will be as fast/accurate about what’s going on in front of your camera compared to a mirror, but if you’re looking at a screen you’re definitely going to want that screen as close to real-time as possible.

Another issue that I had with this camera in a race setting is the inability to “chimp” efficiently. As much as that term bugs me sometimes, it’s the perfect word to describe the action of “looking down right after a shot to see what it looks like” like a chimp inspecting something in front of them.
We ALL do this at the track CONSTANTLY. This can mean the difference between sorting through 500 photos when you download your card or 800 photos.

Now, I wasn’t using the most expensive SD card out there, so I’m sure there was some margin of error (read: slow) due to a cheaper card. But I don’t own SD cards since all my cameras use CF cards. So I’ll take some blame for the possible slow speed of writing to a less-expensive card I bought to save money.
However the camera seemed to write very very slow despite using a class 10 card as I was told to do. It was so slow, in fact, that I actually gave up trying to look at the photos I just shot because the camera was buffering them slowly. This won’t work for those of us who are used to quickly sorting through photos right after we shoot them, deleting (quickly) the bad/OOF shots, and being ready for when the next cars come by.
Note: After discussing this with Sony as well they pointed out the the horsepower of the a77 and it’s processor can’t compete at a level that’s near the power of the dual processors of the 1D lineup. It’s simply something that you will have to deal with at the price point of the a77. This was something I hadn’t put a lot of consideration to those days at the track because I don’t shoot with a 60D, ever.

Also another downside to the camera and the digital viewfinder setup was the sensor. On a bright and sunny day we all will put our hands around the LCD when reviewing shots. The light sensor on the back of the a77 always thought I was putting my face back up to the camera and would switch the view mode back to the camera’s viewfinder. This made it impossible at times for me to review photos without turning my entire body away from the sun (and action) to review photos in my own shadow rather than just use my hand.
Note: I discussed this with Sony, also. There are two options to handle this that were pointed out. First is to set the screen option to manual. So, using a button you can switch from viewfinder mode, to LCD, and back again. I personally would not like this option since it involves additional key presses and I’m sure that at some point I would put the viewfinder back to my eye quickly and forget to turn the viewfinder “on” by switching modes. The second option is to un-click the second the hinge of the LCD screen. This would lock the LCD into the “on” mode, however I have a feeling that there would be the same problem with not auto-switching back to the viewfinder when you try to use it again unless you click the LCD all the way back into position. Both of these simply would take practice and getting used to on the part of the photographer – they’re not something I would consider an end-all to using this system by any means.
My experiences with Off Road were similar to that of Formula Drift, so I won’t ramble on too much about it here.
However out at the off road track I tried the focus locking a bit more to see how well it would track a subject.
The way the focus lock works (put most simply) is that it would lock onto whatever was closest to the center and then track it as it moved around. Think of it as facial recognition tracking for large groups – that’s an easy way to describe it.
However when you have a bunch of trucks crossing paths and everything kinda blends together I think the system because overwhelmed. So, instead I stuck with Continuous focus and found that I got a bit better results as long as I kept my subject in the center of my viewfinder.

Overall thoughts on racing photography with the a77: Overall… it’s a very usable system. I think my initial experience shooting Drift with the a77 was hindered by the too-long lens combo on a track that was smaller than I expected. Below you will no photos from Drift, actually, because I’m just simply not happy with any of them.
I had much better luck at the Off Road track during the Lucas Oil Off Road race. The first day I was there was mostly practice which allowed me more time to shoot around and text. The system here, and longer glass worked very well, and with a larger track (both in size and distance) there was more time and flexibility when reviewing photos after shooting them.

Click the break for photos!

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A little sportbike rig shooting with friends.

We’ve been having some great weather here in Southern California recently. So about a week ago I went out with some friends to do a little rig shooting on sport bikes.

We ended up having a really chill afternoon out riding. Tons of great clouds left over from the recent weather patterns that have been blowing through the area, and a warm sunny afternoon without much heat at all.
Since I had rented a fisheye lens for BMX photos the two days before this shoot, I wanted to make sure to get as much use out of the lens as I could. So I hit up my buddies here to see if they wanted to try various shots.

We started with a few passes up and down the highway for some motion images of riding. I shoot and ride one-handed for those types of shots, and found that it was much harder to use a fisheye this way than my 16-35 f/2.8 that I normally would use.
For the rest of images I used my rig arm and remotes to create those photos.

I’ll just go right into sharing those now.

First up was Al.
All of us ride recreationally, so none of have full riding suits like Adam who I did my last rig shoot with. The images came out great though and I’ve been experimenting with various types of editing for different looks.

This was a quick shot as Al left to do a second pass. That’s me in the background taking a shot with the remote that’s in my hand – Frank and Nolan are sitting on the curb.

This was the shot we ended up liking the most. Al leaned just enough to look toward the camera as he passed.

Next up was Nolan and his girlfriend Serena. The sunset added a lot of great color his gunmetal grey CBR600RR.

I was worried the rig arm would be too short for these images, but it ended up working pretty nicely. At least for a crazy skewed-angle type shot. Haha!

Last up was Frank and his white 600RR.

We also tried this shot of both Al (left) and Frank (right) riding together since they both have white bikes.

The final shot of the night was one of Al. This is actually shot by me while riding alongside him on a Yamaha R1.
I have the camera rig mounted low on the swingarm and am firing remotely while riding. (the remote is taped to the gas tank)
Definitely one of my favorite shots from the afternoon.

Here is how I created that image. I’m on right, Al is on the left.
Thank you to Frank for the photo!

Here’s a short video compilation from clips that Frank shot that afternoon! Mostly just him goofing around and cracking jokes. But you get to see a little bit of how this shoot was done.
I’m going to pick up a Flip camera or something soon so I can start creating more behind the scenes videos for you guys.

And here are a few more images from earlier that afternoon that I took.

I think it’s funny that every time we go riding Serena only happened to bring heels that day. But, we don’t do anything too crazy or fast..

All of us before heading out to do rig shooting. Frank is there, just behind me… whoops!

This was shot by Serena. So now I have a photo of me riding too! Woo hoo!

Hopefull you guys all enjoyed the images. Sorry for the delay. This past Friday I went down on the bike in a turn. It was low speed, but I hit some dirt/gravel as I was turning from one street to another. I hit my helmet in two places on opposite sides as I rolled. Always wear protective gear people. You never know what could happen. I’m fine, just a little sore. Bike is good, just some scrapes and cosmetic damage.

Check back soon for more upcoming shoots!

BMX, with Sean Logan

I wanted to share more images of BMXer Sean Logan with you guys as promised.
As I talked about in my last blog update, I spent part of last weekend at the jumps with Sean Logan and Eric Hough. It was great to have a couple hours to just work on getting some great images that not only looked good, but were also accurate trick shots timed correctly on both Sean and my part as the photographer.

Unfortunately I don’t know the names of the tricks that Sean throws, there are a lot of names to remember and between all the shooting we did I simply lost track.

This was earlier in the afternoon. On bright, hotter days these jumps have much more of a harsh yellowed desert look. But we had some great clouds to work with this past weekend.

The only bad thing about these jumps is that they’re surrounded by power lines – which I try and remove from some shots.

This is shot from the handlebars with a fisheye lens. I’m thinking a mounted shot in a jump like this could potentially be pretty awesome. But Sean said he tried it and it didn’t work well. Bummer.

Toward the end of the day we moved locations slightly to take advantage of this tree at sunset.
All the shots we did here came out great.

This was one I shared in my last post, but I’m sharing again..

Coming up will hopefully be more images of BMXer’s Eric Hough and Cody McKenna. I’m just waiting on them to sort through the images I took so they can tell me which are the best shots (in the BMX world) – because they look for things in their technique that I don’t notice.

So check back soon!
I’ll also have photos and video from my motorcycle shoot to share with everyone.

So much amazing news! And some BMX! LOL!

It’s been a while since I’ve posted, nearly three weeks! I’ve been swamped with travel and also my little sister’s wedding!!
But I have some other really amazing news to share with everyone – even though most of you know. My images from Eryn Holl’s wedding were featured on both CNN.com and AOL.com’s homepages! How incredible.

Eryn’s father Steve Holl’s fight with brain cancer and the experimental treatment that has helped prolong his life has made headlines and grabbed national attention. His story has been shared all over the U.S. and also has been broadcast during the Stand Up 2 Cancer telethon on national television. My photos from the wedding were shown on TV, and the image above has been used on tons of different websites.

It’s really incredible the reach that their story has had.

Also, before leaving town a few weeks ago for my sister’s wedding I met up with BMX stunt riders Sean Logan and Eric Hough.
Above is Sean getting some serious air at the jumps here in Burbank.

It was great to catch up with these guys again. I was shocked how long it had been since I last photographed them.

I don’t know the exact names of all the tricks Sean was throwin out, but he’s really impressive to watch in person.
We spent a lot of time BS’ing and talking. It was also incredibly hot that afternoon so Sean and Eric were takin it a bit easier than normal.

Unfortunately the jumps were overgrown with a lot of shrubs. So it made most all of the camera angles terrible. And it really detracts from just how high in the air Sean is. That bush, is about seven feet tall in front of me that I’m trying to shoot over.

Eric was throwing some pretty hard tricks, too.
And again, the bushes really take away from just how high he’s getting on these jumps.

Sean, left, and Eric, top, takin a break. It was still in the 80s when we were finishing shooting at 6pm.
Crazy weather that day, and these guys were probably burning up I would guess. Hell, I was sweatin’ a ton myself and I was just wearing some cargo shorts while standing there cooking in the sun.

About to call it a day and head out..

I have so many more shots I’d love to share with everyone from family shoots I did recently, too. I also have a bunch of photos from my little sister’s wedding a week ago. But, I’m going to have to save those and do a much longer blog about it separately. And expect another post soon about last week’s rooftop shoot that I did with eight models, two make up artists, and two hair stylists. I have a ton of great images from that.

Check back soon! I’ll be doing more frequent updates again since I’m back from traveling.

New Sports Portraits, and some bikes.

This week’s post is going to be a mix of a few things. I’ve been without internet (part of our city was out for three days) and am just getting back into the swing of things before leaving for Michigan on business Wednesday morning.
One of the shoots I did last week was with a model, and friend, named Chris Franklin. I met Chris two years ago doing fashion shows in Hollywood. He’s part of a small group of people from that time frame that I keep in touch with. Most of all of us from that group have gone on and climbed further and further up within our various careers (ie: photography, modeling, make up artistry, etc).
Chris has recently wrapped various projects with Nike and Adidas – so we talked about putting together some more sports images that could help his portfolio with different looks and style.

“Highest production value, John…” is what Chris said when I asked what he was wanting this shoot to look like. I’ll be honest, this shoot was a lot of laughs and story telling catching up on the last year. I had a few ideas in mind of things I wanted to try with lighting. Some of the shots hit, some of them missed. The running image above is close to what I was going for, but, I will likely try and bring Chris out again to reshoot it… I’m not completely happy with it.

The hardest part of our day was finding empty athletic fields to use, or ones that had public access for that matter. Overall I’m very happy with the images that Chris and I came back with.
I am, however, about to expand my gear (again) and purchase a lot of new lighting equipment… So I’ll be doing a lot more athlete and sports themed photoshoots in the near future.

Below I’m going to share some of the other basketball images of Chris. Please feel free to comment on which of them you like.

Before I did this shoot with Chris, I did some test shooting… with Beau.

Beau is one of my best friends, and old roommate. He is currently a working actor out on the east coast, but returns here to California from time to time as he prepares to move back west.
While in town last week though, I made him stand in as my test subject for the lighting style I wanted to do with Chris. I was pretty happy with how it turned out for a first attempt. I may go in and re-edit slighly; they’re a bit too contrasty right now. We’ll see.

Beau even needed a quick, updated, headshot while he was here… which was definitely easy to do outside that afternoon.

Lastly, I went riding yesterday with my friends Crazy Mike and Lyla Dee. You guys will remember Mike and Lyla from their shoot on Venice beach at night in the sand and water.
Well, it’s been months since seeing these two so yesterday I met up went riding with them. This shot was taken, by me, one-handed while riding alongside Mike on a R1 myself, haha.

Shot this image the same way. This is done with my 5DII (not my 1D) and a 16-35mm. Yes, I do put my gear in harm’s way from time to time. But, I get some really cool photos that way… Risk is just part of the job.

Mike also wanted a burnout shot… That smell takes me right back to shooting Formula Drift! Hahaha.

That’s it for this update, hope you guys hung around and checked out everything.
Wednesday I’m leaving for Detroit where I will spend the rest of the week for the D’Orazio wedding. Mike and Christina are a really amazing couple. I had a great time with them last July when I shot their engagement photos during another trip to Michigan. Their wedding will definitely be a blast – and with over 300 guests I even hired my friend (and photographer) Casey Shortt to assist me with all the madness.

Following the D’Orazio wedding I will be heading to Portland to attend my friend Theresa’s wedding in Vancouver. I may even be able to do some shooting while up there. We’ll see what happens.

Check back around the beginning of next week though! I’ll try and have a few previews up from the wedding! And I’ll definitely have some shots from the new 85mm f/1.2 lens I ordered!!

Vijay Singh, my golf-Monday

Monday evening I had the pleasure of meeting professional golfer Vijay Singh.
I was photographing a private event for one of his sponsors – Vijay was the guest the speaker. I’ll be honest that it was really cool to be part of a small private event where Vijay sat around and just chatted about his career, golf, life, etc.

Vijay opened up the floor to questions from the people attending. Having watched golf for at least 10 years, I would have liked to ask him one or two things myself. However, I was there to shoot, it would have been hugely unprofessional of me to do so.

But, afterward I had the opportunity to introduce myself and take a quick photo.
If you ever have the opportunity to meet him, he’s an incredibly nice person.

So far February is off to a good start. I’m catchin up on editing wedding images from last month. I’m also going to be booking a couple TF/trade shoots this month. If you have a unique look, or awesome idea, contact me.

Kickin’ it with Sean Logan

One thing that I love about being a photographer is that I meet some truly amazing people – more often than not, they’re also extremely talented.

I met Sean last month while shooting with Crazy Mike. Sean’s a pro BMXer, stunt rider, etc. Last time we shot I was actually there with a few other photographers/videographers while Sean was filming another project. However yesterday was simply another day at the jumps that Sean called me up and invited me to.

I’m actually pretty happy with most of the images. A huge cloud cover blew in on my drive to the jumps – which killed the lighting and made things pretty bland until sunset. But after sundown things became pretty colorful… for about twenty minutes, haha!

Also jumping that day was Eric Hough. Eric’s great, he always throws tricks really hard to play for my camera – and I always down for that.

Shooting with these guys is fun, they’re really chill and fun to BS with during the shoot. I look forward to working with them more and putting together some more shoots and really mix things up.
As bummed as I was by not having a bright sunny afternoon to shoot, I’m very happy with how the dusk/night images turned out since I’ve been wanting shots like this for my portfolio for quite a while.

This week ahead of me is going to be pretty busy. I’ll be back up in LA/Hollywood tomorrow, shooting with my good friend David Esquire on Tuesday, and then flying out to Michigan on Thursday to shoot Tara and Matt’s wedding this weekend!
I need to put together some more projects for February since I’m pretty booked up the rest of this month. I have some new ideas that I’m working on…

Here’s a few more shots from yesterday for you to enjoy..
Check back later this week for another update; and definitely look for an update this weekend, too!


Eric, in the middle of throwing a full 360.


Danny.

Sean threw a backflip unexpectedly… I was bummed only because I hadn’t framed my shot to include the jump… so I lost quite a bit of effect by him simply floating mid air… next time though… next time..